NASA’s Juno spacecraft captured this image of the jets and vortices in Jupiter’s North Temperate Belt, as the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby of the gas giant.

The North North Temperate Belt is the prominent reddish-orange band left of center. It rotates in the same direction as the planet and is predominantly cyclonic, which in the northern hemisphere means its features spin in a counter-clockwise direction. Within the belt are two gray-colored anticyclones.

To the left of the belt is a brighter band (the North North Temperate Zone) with high clouds whose vertical relief is accentuated by the low angle of sunlight near the terminator. These clouds are likely made of ammonia-ice crystals, or possibly a combination of ammonia ice and water. Although the region as a whole appears chaotic, there is an alternating pattern of rotating, lighter-colored features on the zone’s north and south sides.

At the time, Juno was about 4,900 miles (7,900 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of Jupiter.

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